Wednesday, June 26, 2019

Missouri Ex-Slave Resource


Colored Marriages of Saline County, MO, 1865-1870
Three hundred and forty-one African-American couples registered their marriages with the Saline County, MO. courthouse between 1865 and 1870. The Colored Marriages of Saline County, 1865 - 1870 is indexed by both groom and bride, and holds a complete copy of the original 111 page Court Recorder Colored Marriage Record book. The marriage records include the names of enslaved children born of each union. It also provides the researcher with names of black settlements, names of active church leaders that performed the marriages, and twenty historical black cemeteries of Saline County, MO.

Published in 2014, this reference book may be available through your local library or Interlibrary Loan (ILL).


Kathleen Brandt, the founder of a3Genealogy, Kansas City, Mo,- was researching in Saline County, MO when she eyed a registry: Colored Marriages of Saline County, 1865-1870. One of the first rights granted to freed-slaves was to legalize their slave marriages. Information from these records will link the African American researcher to slave ancestors. It will also encourage descendants of Slave Masters to reference one more resource in their research.  

 Get your copy now!  

Colored Marriages 1865-1870
 

Colored Marriages 1865-1870
 
Kathleen Brandt
a3genealogy.com
a3genealogy@gmail.com

Thursday, June 20, 2019

Irish Research, Canadian Immigration 1847-1848

Joliet (IL) Signal, 17 Aug 1847
We often need to be reminded to streatch our research.  Irish research is an a3Genealogy favorite.  Here are some tips to locating that elusive ancestor. 

Grosse Île - Immigration and Quarantines
Immigrating has always had high risk crossing the seas, and for those who survived the travel faced  a full documentation and most often medical review. Newly arrived immigrants to North America – specifically Canada and the USA – were documented at processing stations and quarantine locations at their entry ports. So as the Irish arrived in every port in North America to escape wars, mistreatment, and famine, genealogists and family researchers must expand their research past New York.  Have you checked for your Irish ancestors in the Gross Île, Port of Québec records? Although the death rate was high, researchers may locate those who survived; and with a keen eye toward analysis, hints and names of other family members may be revealed.


Parks Canada Map
Gross Île Quarantine Station
Gross Île “was a quarantine station for the Port of Québec from 1832 – 1937. This quarantine station, located in the middle of the St. Lawrence River just south-east of Quebec, was originally established to contain the cholera epidemic in 1832.

Over 8000 immigrants, mostly Irish died of “Ship Fever” from 1847 - 1848, some referred to these ships as “coffin ships,” due to the typhus epidemic.  It has been estimated that over five thousand Irish were buried at sea. Many were interred in mass graves.

Visit Irish Central, The Ghosts of Grosse Ile. A monument was even erected in 1850 to honor those lost during the transport.
Montreal Star, 22 Dec 1900, p.19
Yet, in the 1847-1848 timeframe over 38 thousand Irish did arrive in Toronto. Toronto also had a high death rate, about 1100 Irish immigrants died of starvation and the harsh Canadian winters. For more information research Toronto’s Ireland Park, a memorial for the Famine Irish.

Know that quarantine stations were not uncommon.  One had been established as early as 1785 in Partridge Island, New Brunswick, near Saint John.  Another quarantine station was at Windmill Point, where over six thousand, mostly Irish, were buried.

Where to Begin?

Kathleen Brandt
a3Genealogy.com
Accurate, accessible answers
(reprint from Dec 2015)

Thursday, May 9, 2019

Exhausting Irish Resources


Prepping for the 2019 Irish Fest 
The 2019 Kansas City Irish Fest (KCIF) will be held 30 Aug - 1 Sep.  This year the Irish Fest will be hosting a four session genealogy workshop.  Tickets will go on sale 1 Jun.  So in preparation, I will be posting interesting tidbits on researching your Irish ancestors. For information on the workshop, contact kcirishfest.com.

Was Your Irish Ancestor in a Benevolent Society?
On 19 Sept 1872 the KC times reported on the first St. Patrick's Day parade in Kansas City.  "At 10:00 am, the procession formed at the hall of the Irish Benevolent Society. The order of  march was as follows: Grand Marshal and aids, Band of Music, Irish Benevolent Society, St. Vitus Benevolent Association (German), The St. Joseph Benevolent Association." [1]

Who, What, When, Where? My Irish Ancestors!
There are more than 250,000 in the Kansas City region who claim Irish heritage and as many ancestors who have participated in the Irish Day Parades beginning in 1872.

Any Irish ancestry researcher would be remiss if they chose to ignore the information this small blurb gives us. A few questions to consider: 1) Where were my ancestor's on that day? 2) Did they participate in the parade? 3) Did they belong to these organizations/societies? 4) Were they involved in the Irish community, church, politics or other labor unions? 5) What was their "pecking" order in the parade? 6) Were there other Irish organizations/societies?

Was He a Miner or a Musician?
"Members of the Ancient Order of Hibernians followed behind the priest and "marched like soldiers, justly proud of their appearance," observed the Times.  Behind the Hibernians were members of the St. Vincent de Paul Society, the Children of Mary and the St. Aloysius Band, marching with a huge portrait of their favored saint, the Patron of Youth, followed by the Irish benevolent societies.  The McGee Hook & Ladder Company rolled along behind department co-founder and Irish immigrant, Joe McArdle, with firemen pluming and strutting for the admiring crowds gathered on porches and sidewalks along the winding route." (Displayed at Kansas City Irish Fest; August 2011).

Just by knowing the origin of each group, you may be guided in the right direction. This is enough information to keep an Irish family researcher busy. Contemporary local books may give your research a jump start.  Newspaper articles, obituaries, journals, diaries, church records and court cases may also give the researcher a bit more information about the members of these organizations. 
Irish Parade Line Up, Kansas City Times
From the Missouri Irish: Kansas City, St. Louis & Trails West
Extract: pg. 141-142 O'Laughlin,  Michael C.
America’s oldest Irish Catholic Fraternal Organization founded concurrently in the coal-mining region of Pennsylvania and New York City in May, 1836.  Early Hibernians are linked to mining for gold (Yreka, CA), copper and silver (Butte & Anaconda, MT), iron ore in Escanaba, MI (St Patrick’s) and Mt Pleasant, PA (St Joseph’s), hard rock mining (St Peter’s, Rutland, VT) and coal in Schuylkill CO, PA. (where the infamous Molly Maguire trials were held.)
   
Molly Maguires
M
embers of an Irish-American secret society.  Members, mainly coal miners were associated with Pennsylvania anthracite coal fields in the Civil War era. The trials and arrests were from 1876−1878.

St. Aloysius Band

Formed from the St. John's society 75-100 'juveniles" of West Kansas City.
St. Vincent de Paul Society
Founded in 1833 by six university students in Paris under the patronage of St. Vincent de Paul. This primarily Irish society was introduced in Chicago during the economic depression of 1857. The Society's purpose was to provide direct aid to the suffering parishioners.
From the Bottom Up: The Story of the Irish in Kansas City, O'Neill, Pat

Reprinted from 16 Sep 2011
Kathleen Brandt
a3Genealogy@gmail.com

Friday, May 3, 2019

French and Spanish Settlers in Pre-Statehood Missouri

Early American Survey using Arpents (Fr)
Missouri - The Midwest Gateway
Before Missouri became a state (1821), before the Anglo-Americans moved West, and before the railroads, steamboats and wagon trains traversed Missouri, there were the French and Spanish Settlers.
Missouri was initially part of the Louisiana Territory.  Known as “Upper Louisiana,” the territory was settled first by the French Canadians as they moved west from Illinois about 1750, establishing St. Genevieve.  Then St. Louis was founded by the French migrating up the Mississippi River from New Orleans in 1767. Although the French had first settled this area, Spain had control from 1762 to 1800, when Spain ceded control to France in a treaty.
With the Louisiana Purchase (1803) from France, America agreed to honor all previous land purchases and claims from the French and Spanish by the settlers.  While noble in theory, it was rather difficult to execute in practice for several reasons.
  • Very few (about 1%) of the original patents (title/deed) of the early settlers were perfected (the paperwork complete)
  • The lots were typically organized in long strips emanating from the town or river and not the standard grid (rectangular survey system) now in place for all Public Lands.
  • The land was measured in French “arpents” not acres as we’re accustomed.  A square arpent is about .84 acre.
  • Often lands not occupied or abandoned by the settler often reverted back to government (French or Spanish) ownership.
Nonetheless, Congress decided to let the settlers complete the patent process, register them with the United States, and retain ownership of their claims. A Board of Commissioners was established in 1808 to sit and hear claims of the settlers as to the proper ownership of their land.  The Board remained in operation through 1812 and gave certificates confirming 1,342 land claims.  New statutes, new boards, and more certificates were granted in 1816 and 1834 certifying 1,754 and 90 more claims respectively.

The Records
[Yes, when Louisiana became a State in 1812, the documents and records were housed in the Missouri Territory until abt. 1821.]

The good news for genealogists is that the records of the Board of Commissioners have been published in several books, segmented by Congressional Session, which fall along a chronological timeline.  Generally these read like court hearings with the land described then witness testimony supplied.
Here we go!
    • 1813: Land claims in the Missouri Territory : records of the 12th Congress, second session, Mountain Press
    • 1834: Private land claims in Missouri, 1834 : United States: House of Representatives document 1178, Twenty-third Congress – First session (full text on Hathi Trust)  by Elijah Hayward, Mountain Press
    • 1835:  Missouri Land Claims published by Polyanthos (1976). The portion selected are the 90 claims approved in the 1834 Commission meeting and the 152 claims rejected by the 1834 Commission . Every name index. [The last claim rejected, #152, says the claimant requested 500,000 arpents.  That’s a lot of land!!  I can see why he was rejected.]
    • 1835: Land claims in Missouri : House of Representatives 24th Congress, First session – document numbered 1538
    • 1835: Final adjustments of private land claims in Missouri, 1832 : House of Representatives document 1340, 24th Congress – First session, 1835 by Ethan Allen Brown, Mountain Press
As an alternative to the original documents, you can try checking out a three volume series by Frances Terry Ingmire, Citizens of Missouri Territory, Mountain Press, 1984.  He has abstracted the Congressional Record and included an every name index.
Finally, if you’re still feeling a little overwhelmed now and are wondering how to navigate a fist full of Congressional hearing records, don’t worry. There’s help. Several finding aids have been published to aid in your research.
Finding Aids
  • Index to Minutes of the First and Second Board of Land Commission Meetings 1805-1812, 1832-1835. by the St. Louis Genealogical Society
  • Early settlers of Missouri as taken from land claims in the Missouri Territory by Walter Lowrie, Southern Historical Press, 1986
  • Index of purchasers : United States land sales in Missouri by Ozarks Genealogical Society, 1985
  • Index to French and Spanish land grants recorded in registers of land titles in Missouri: Books A, B, C, D, E by Betty Harvey Williams, self-published, 1977
If your ancestor staked a claim in Pre-Statehood Missouri, you have an impressive story to tell. It’s well worth your time to find the documents to shape the story to share with the next generation.

Article reprint from "Genealogy Decoded" with permission by:
Beth Foulk
About the Author
Research Relationship with a3Genealogy since 2008 Beth Foulk has turned a lifetime genealogy passion into an opportunity to share what she’s learned with genealogists across the country. She has documented her Civil War, War of 1812, and Revolutionary War ancestors.  She has mapped the migration of her Kansas and Missouri pioneers.  And researched the arrival of her many Massachusetts Colonial settlers. 
Each ancestor and each story quickly become a “teaching moment” for her classes. “The only thing more fun than a genealogy find, is sharing what I’ve learned to help other genealogists.”

Foulk has been “spreading the genealogy gospel” since 2008 when she first taught as a volunteer at the Midwest Genealogy Center in Independence, Missouri.

Monday, March 25, 2019

Why We Pull Wills?


Brickwalls and Unscrambling Common Names
I know I pound this in absolutely EVERY genealogy presentation, post and speaking engaging I have given.  But let's remember to pull a copy of the WILL and PROBATE. We can't always get the original, but don't depend on the abstracts and (hit me over the head, even!!!) please don't just glance at an index.

What was here?
The four sons were named. Believe me, when working with Dodd's of New Jersey, unscrambling family units is not an easy task.  In addition, father Stephen H. Dodd named his own father.  In honoring his father, Stephen generously proffered his father's name, Samuel T. Dodd, and his wife. So now I know Stephen, son of Samuel T Dodd, was married to Letitia and had these four sons. and a daughter who was mentioned by the date of this will.

It was all just laid out for the descendants.

Great Monday!

Thursday, March 7, 2019

Polish Research - Where Do You Start?

Getting Started
The a3Genealogy International Team has been tackling large Polish ancestry project the past year. We have bragging rights for breaking brickwalls if given enough time.  These projects are not easy, most of the in-country documents are not indexed.  There are different research techniques for Jewish ancestry in Poland, and Catholic.  Let’s further break this down.  Catholic genealogical research is even divided between Roman Catholicism and the Greek Catholic Church.  Have you heard of Ruthenian? I’ll explain that late.  Bu the way…Polish genealogical research is not really in Poland. It includes the full eastern bloc to include Ukraine, Austria, Russia, Hungary, and Czech.  No…it’s not easy! So where do you start.

As with all genealogical research start with yourself.  Exhaust the American or Canadian or European, or Australian records.  Those are just some of our projects.  You should be ferreting out all you can, on you surname (and remember that surname can be spelled in a half dozen ways.)  But start with the most recent spelling and be flexible. What to look for in the online collections?  Yes, start online.  It’s one of the few times I will say, spend lots of time, just pulling online records. 
  • Census records -will give you family units.  Not a big hint since the same names may be in the household three doors down, but pay attention to occupation, military service, education level, age, and place/date of birth.  These small details will become life-safer later.
  • Death records of your immigrant may hold family secrets.  Plus you will want to pull the birth records of all of their children.  This will narrow down the emigration, and help to tie family units in Europe.
  • Military records -these records give us contact persons’ names, and date and place of birth. May mention if your ancestor was an alien or naturalization.  You may find that the next of kin is a wife back in Galicia Poland (let’s say), or family that did not travel, or maybe state where in Galicia, or Tarnapol or one of the powiat, or voivodeship, gmina.  
Collecting more is best.  The reason is when we “jump the pond”, we get to match these people like a Rubik's cube.

  1. Immigration / Passenger List records – Here you are looking for birth information, “home” contact, and arrival contract.  Don’t get discouraged if it names an in-law or acquaintance, as these may be your key to the correct ancestor.  You will want to use all of your tools for this to include but not limited to:
  2. Ellis Island Passenger Search
  3. Familysearch.org, NY Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924
  4. The National Archives, AAD is a great resource for Russian and German (index files).
  5. Naturalization Records – just start online, but you need copies of the originals (the indices gives us minimal details, and really, is more for confusion than untangling family units. Don’t forget Declaration of Intent records (1st Papers).  By the way this is where you will find change of names too.  My Wasyl changed his legally to Walter
  6. Special Boards of Inquiry, Immigration Records,  – a common overlooked one.  There aren’t a lot that have been digitized, but exhaust there first, the find out where your Special Boards of Immigration Inquiry are located (if salvaged).  What will you learn? LOTS!
  • Character of the immigrant
  • Family situation
  • Family members
  • Occupation
  • Migratory path
His Story

Her Story

OH....and 
  • Lots of lies, but more truths.  Luckily these sworn statements help us wade through the obvious issues here.


Immigration Records, Boards of Special Inquiry (BSI)

Today I worked in the Philadelphia, PA Immigration Records, Special Boards of Inquiry, between 1893-1909 digitized on ancestry.com.  I have also worked with this record collection in the regional National Archives - NY. 

Other Sources: 
This is the time for super passenger/manifests list knowledge.  Matter fact, if you have been waiting for an excuse to understand the markings, locations, how to use them,  the time has arrived to be the best friend of passenger and manifests lists.
Kathleen Brandt
a3Genealogy@gmail.com
Accurate, accessible answer

Monday, February 18, 2019

Research Tips to Tracing American Ancestors Overseas

Ancestor Disappeared?
Consular Records
Did your ancestor travel overseas for work, missionary work, U.S. government work? Was a child of an American citizen born overseas? This occurred frequently with customary long overseas visits. The Department of State records, various records of death notices of US citizens abroad should be scoured for your elusive ancestor.  Don’t dismiss these records as only for those who were naturalized USA citizens and returned to their native land to visit family. Vacationers fell sick, were victims of violence, automobile accidents, or were imprisoned, etc. These records also included deaths that occurred in Canada and the Americas.



What to Expect
In addition to providing genealogical data of family members and kinship, often a passport number is provided. In the case of Spyrus Kansas, Greek born, but naturalized citizen of the USA, the names and addresses of his wife and siblings are provided, along with his passport number and his burial (and re-interment) information with the cause of death.  It even gives information on the family home being attacked by guerilla forces while in Greece. 

Married in Europe
Women were often naturalized by marriage; and travelled on a joint passport. See Passports Applications for Genealogy.  In doing so, American citizens (by marriage) like that of Germaine Jackson’s death states she was a [USA] native by marriage, but born in Paris.  The good news for the researcher is that for clarification, her marriage date, and address of her French family and origin are provided.

Death at Sea
It’s no surprise that many died at sea. There are 333 records of Titanic casualties; limited to the bodies found. Obviously sea voyage continued to the destination, and the deaths were reported to the Dept. of State, upon arrival as was William Morris’s death. Morris of New York was  traveling to Brussels in 1903.

Foreign Death Certificates
Often research leads us to locating a foreign death certificate. Know that foreign death certificates are most often written in the foreign language where the death occurred. For forensic genealogical searches of heir, estates, and dual citizenships, these foreign death certificates are a place to begin your search, but are usually not accepted for USA insurance or estates and may be denied for Dual Citizenship records. (This is only applicable for foreign consulates that still require ancestor death certificates.)   

Foreign Service Post Records
If your ancestor served the USA on an assigned foreign diplomatic or other government post, records can be located in Record Group (RG) 84: Foreign Service Post Records of the US Department of State.  Textural records of the death (plus births and marriages) from 1788-1962 of US citizens may be found in the Records of Diplomatic Posts (RG 84.2) and Records of Consular Posts, RG84.3.

Locating the Records
Although ancestry.com has digitized the Reports of Deaths of American Citizens Abroad, 1835 -1974, researchers must know that the original National Archive death records are archived in four reference collections: 
  • Record of Death Notices of United States Citizens Abroad, 1835 – 1855 
  • Death Notices of United States Citizens Abroad, 1857 – 1922  
  • Death Reports in the State Department Central Decimal File, 1910-1963 
  • Reports of the Deaths of American Citizens, 1963-1974
For More Information

Kathleen Brandt
a3Genealogy.com
a3genealogy.blogspot.com

(Original posted 16 Feb 2013)