Friday, November 22, 2019

Chancery Court Records

Sally Grimes, daughter of Gabriel Winston
Why Do We Forget Chancery Court Records?
Chancery Court records can be brickwall busters. Yet they are often overlooked.  Case in point, trying to sort common surnames and their family units. Let's take "Johnson" in 1700 Virginia.  Using the Chancery Court records we were able to distinguish Silas Johnson's family unit of VA. We were also  able to prove kinship of his Johnson descendants who settled in Howard County, Missouri. All the children were named in grandpa's record since their dad had died. 

Kinships Named: Parents and Maiden Names
As family researchers and genealogists, one of our common brick-walls is a result of the lack of resources to confirm kinships. Familiar relationships, parents’ names,  maiden names are all needed to complete family units, but what happens when we’ve exhausted all the normal resources - census, wills/probates, deeds, vital records, church records…etc.? Well, hopefully the researcher has not overlooked Chancery Records when they are available.

What are Chancery Court Records?
Chancery Court records hold a wealth of genealogical information. Although not necessarily a part of every states’ historical legal system, when available it will behoove the researcher to take more than a cursory glance at these genealogical-rich documents. Researchers will find personal testimonies that include family relationships. In some states (i.e. Virginia, Tennessee, etc) chancery court records are available from the early 18th century through early 1900’s. In Virginia alone there are over 233,000 multi-paged cases. More on Virginia Chancery Courts can be found at this informative piece. 

What is "Next Friend?"
Of course the key to understanding any court record relies on period vocabulary. In the Chancery Court record of Sally Grimes of Hanover County, VA vs. Joseph Grimes, Sally’s father Gabriel Winston is identified as both “father” and “next friend.”

A "next friend" can be considered the person who represents and speaks on behalf of the plaintiff. The next friend may be a parent, a guardian, an older sibling , etc.  By no means should the researcher assume it is a parent or even a relationship. We have uncovered many next friends proven not to be of blood relation.  In many cases the next friend is identified, removing the tempting guessing game and solidly identifying kinships. This is most useful, when also looking for a maiden name.  

Unlike many states, Delaware's "Court of Chancery" has survived since 1792.  Of course its roles, jurisdictions and litigation realms have been consistently updated to meet the needs of the court to include corporate litigation. Visit Delaware Courts for a quick history of the English Origins of the "Court of Chancery." 

As the times have changed, so has the role of the Chancery Court. In current day Mississippi Chancery Courts are the repository for land records.  Researchers will also find divorces, guardianships and wills in the Mississippi Chancery Courts.

Other states like Missouri, may boast of early records of the Chancery Court.  For St. Louis MO. Chancery Court Records may be found as early as 1811 to about the Civil War.  These records can be found at the Missouri State Archives. Like other states, Missouri researchers may find other counties with salvaged Chancery Court Records.  

Be sure to check FamilySearch Wiki for your state / county. 
(Updated from Chancery Court Records for Genealogy Brickwalls posted 3 May 2016).

Kathleen Brandt
a3Genealogy@gmail.com
accurate, accessible answers














Sunday, November 3, 2019

Researching War of 1812 Seaman

Impressed Seamen Records 1796-1868

After the revolutionary war, the British, under the motto “once a British subject, always a British subject”, took liberties on the sea and captured US flagged vessels.  The result: “Impressed” American mariners into British service, and of course, the War of 1812. For this reason, many will tell you the Revolutionary War did not end until the War of 1812. Yet, impressed seaman protection certificates were available to seaman until after the civil war. And actually they have been used at different times in U.S. history.

In order to track American sailors and their ships, a plethora of detailed paperwork and records were generated on merchant seamen.  These salvaged papers can be a treasure chest for the family historian. 

Quick Primer
A quick primer on the Seamen’s Protection Center can be found on the the Ancestry.com Learning Center. 

Search for Seamen's Protection Certificate Learning Center
As you can see in the photo above the seaman came from all states. The collection holds certificates for seamen between 11-77 years of age.  Above, John Finn, was 14 year old and was from Hermann, Mo.  He worked out of the Port of Philadelphia. So, don’t limit your research.

It is possible your seaman was captured and his original (or second or third) certificate was confiscated. So it is not uncommon to find several applications for one seaman. 

Begin Your Search
Ancestry.com has a digitized collection of U.S. Seamen’s Protection Certificates.  

African American Seamen
Historical Trivia
Question: What African American slave ran away with the assistance of a U.S. Seamen’s Protection Certificate.
Answer: Frederick Douglass who borrowed a Seamen’s Certificate to aid in his runaway. He was also donning a sailor suit. 
African Americans seamen were in abundance.  The records identify them as “black”, “negro”, “colored”, “sambo”, “ethiopian” and “mulatto”.  


Four Bonus Finds
 
1) Physical Descriptions. As you can see, physical description to include scars and marks are noted.  Statement of “native” hometown and stated is also noted.

2) Emancipation Information. In the above example of Samuel Ridley, an ex-slave, informs the intaker that he “was manumitted in the year 1792 by Stephen... Samuel’s application goes on to tell us that he had to serve nine years for a man (name given) in Philadelphia for his freedom. 

3) Naturalization Information. Of course to have protection of the United States, you had to prove citizenship as Bernard Tobin did below on his application. 
 
Do hereby declare that I am a Seaman and an affiliated Citizen of the United States, having been born in the Town of St. Johns Newfoundland and have declared my Intention of becoming a citizen of the United States in the Circuit Court holden in Philadelphia on the 27th of December 1856 a certificate whereof I herewith present . . .
4) Family Information. As in the example above all the certificates are sworn by a witness. This witness is often a family member.  Sometimes, we find wife’s or mother’s names on these applications.  

1930 Census, Merchant Seaman
Know that the War of 1812 is not the only time merchants were enumerated. In 1930 census Merchant Seamen were enumerated if serving on a US flagged vessel. There was a special Merchant Seamen schedule.  This schedule provided genealogical data and can be searched on the 1930 Census of Merchant Seamen on ancestry.com or with in the NARA (microfilm). View the  Family Search.org website for more information.


For More Information
Be sure to read the following articles:
National Archive Resources
  • M2025: Registers of Applications for the Release of Impressed Seamen (microfilm)
  • M1839: Miscellaneous Lists and Papers Regarding Impressed Seamen, 1796-1814  (microfilm) 
Kathleen Brandt
Website: a3genealogy.com
a3genealogy@gmail.com
Accurate, accessible answers

(Original post 1 Jun 2013)

Thursday, September 19, 2019

2020 Speaker Series


One Motivated Mama Inspirational "Where you are going" Canvas by Ana Brandt.    www.shoptaopan.com  #inspiration #motivation #knowwhereyouaregoing #whereyoucamefrom #canvas #wallart #motivatedmama:
Visit Ana Brandt's Site
These are just a few titles offered by Kathleen Brandt as a conference Keynote Speaker or seminar Presenter. All are tailored to your conference theme or celebration. If you don't see what you want here, know I offer custom designed presentations and workshops. Know that all of the presentations are chocked full of actual images and many have real life short case studies. 

I am now scheduling for 2017.  But remember, I am often called upon as a last minute substitute, because we can never plan for those unplanned "life" events

Be sure to review the Experience/Qualifications page. 

Kathleen Brandt
Keynote Speaker/Presenter
816-729-5995

Presentation Titles for Your Conference or Workshops

Military
Revolutionary War
·         Finding Your Revolutionary War Soldier
·         7 Best Revolutionary War Resources
·         Your Blacksheep: Courts-martial and Courts of inquiry records
War of 1812
·         War of 1812 Records: 10 Places to Research
·         Researching Your War of 1812 Impressed Seamen
Revolutionary War and War of 1812
·         African Americans Served Too – Finding Records
Civil War
·         10 Best Bets for Civil War Research 
·         7 Tips to Researching Slaves and Slaveholders
·         Finding Your Elusive Civil War Veteran
·         Claim It!  Southern Claims Commission Records and Slave Claims Commission Records
·         Researching Grand Army of the Republic (GAR) and other Association Records
·         Civil War POW Records
Modern Wars (WWI - WWII
·         Military Records Were Destroyed? What to Do?
·         7 Easy Tips to WWI and WWII Research
·         Forgotten Records -  WWI and WWII

Research Methodology
·         Leaping Over Brickwalls
·         The Changing Surname - How to Trace It?

DNA
·         DNA: Spit or Swab?  (Beginner)
·         DNA for Genealogists: Who? What?, When? Where? (Intermediate)
·         From History to Present: DNA Research (Case Studies)
·         DNA All Day Workshop (all levels)
·         Using DNA for your Brickwalls (Intermediate)
·         DNA for Private Investigators (How It's Done)
·         Connecting Biological Families (As Seen On TV)

Research Tools
·         Tech Toys for Genealogists: It’s All Portable
·         Oral and Family History: Sharing Our Ancestors
·         The Cloud: Looking Forward to Backing Up
·         Technology Toolbox for Genealogists

African American Research
·         7 Tips to Researching Slaves and Slaveholders (with MO. Case Study)
·         Researching the Road to Freedom (Prior to the Civil War)
·         7 Resources to Researching Missouri Ex-Slaves and Free-Coloreds.
·         Using Ship Manifests for Slave Research
·         African Americans Served Too: Finding Revolutionary War and War of 1812 Records
·         A History of Military Service by African Americans (Learn about these Veterans and the Records) 


International: Emigration - Immigration
·         When They Came to America Where Did They Go?
·         Blackbirding: Sugar, Cotton, and Slaves! Researching South Pacific Island Laborers
·         Did Your Ancestor Become a US Citizen? Where to find Records and Documents

Local Topics and Custom Designed Presentations
Have a unique topic?  Due to our vast client base and experience, presentation just for your local group can be customized. Of course actual images of documents and relevant research tips are shared and often accompanied by a case study.
·         “Delegation of Colored Men” 7 Resources to Researching Western-North Carolina Ex-Slaves and Free-Coloreds.
·         Pioneer Trail From Missouri to California: How to Trace Them?
·         Tracing My State Militia Records
·         Tracing Huguenots – From There to Here

Motivational
·         Your Pioneer Ancestor and You!  How Our Ancestors Did It?
·         The Invisible Staircase: How Missouri Did It!

Entrepreneur You
·         Make Money: Your Genealogy Empire


Midwest and Missouri Specific
Image result for midwest map
Midwest German Settlers
·         Researching Germans from Russia Ancestors
·         8 Tips to Researching Your Missouri Rhineland Ancestors

Missouri Irish
·         Tips to Tracing Your MO. Irish Ancestor - From Immigration to Emigration

Bohemian Settlements
·         5 Research Tips to MO. Bohemian Ancestors

Wednesday, August 28, 2019

Kansas City Irish Fest

Will I be seeing you at the Kansas City Irish Fest?

Kathleen Brandt of a3Genealogy will be presenting four fun filled Irish research topics this Saturday, 31 Sat. She will share how the professionals solve cases, and best tips and hints to Irish brickwalls. a3Genealogy is an international genealogical and historical research firm. 

Surname changes? No problem! Did you know DNA - can help with that brickwall? Where did your Irish ancestor settle? Tracing your MIssouri Irish? (Wink wink, this does span further than Kansas City). 

Just getting started, or hitting a brick wall, this is a great place to start. Be sure to get your ticket! 

Click Kansas City Irish Fest for more information.

Let's hope the Irish good luck will bring us perfect weather.

Wednesday, June 26, 2019

Missouri Ex-Slave Resource


Colored Marriages of Saline County, MO, 1865-1870
Three hundred and forty-one African-American couples registered their marriages with the Saline County, MO. courthouse between 1865 and 1870. The Colored Marriages of Saline County, 1865 - 1870 is indexed by both groom and bride, and holds a complete copy of the original 111 page Court Recorder Colored Marriage Record book. The marriage records include the names of enslaved children born of each union. It also provides the researcher with names of black settlements, names of active church leaders that performed the marriages, and twenty historical black cemeteries of Saline County, MO.

Published in 2014, this reference book may be available through your local library or Interlibrary Loan (ILL).


Kathleen Brandt, the founder of a3Genealogy, Kansas City, Mo,- was researching in Saline County, MO when she eyed a registry: Colored Marriages of Saline County, 1865-1870. One of the first rights granted to freed-slaves was to legalize their slave marriages. Information from these records will link the African American researcher to slave ancestors. It will also encourage descendants of Slave Masters to reference one more resource in their research.  

 Get your copy now!  

Colored Marriages 1865-1870
 

Colored Marriages 1865-1870
 
Kathleen Brandt
a3genealogy.com
a3genealogy@gmail.com

Thursday, June 20, 2019

Irish Research, Canadian Immigration 1847-1848

Joliet (IL) Signal, 17 Aug 1847
We often need to be reminded to streatch our research.  Irish research is an a3Genealogy favorite.  Here are some tips to locating that elusive ancestor. 

Grosse Île - Immigration and Quarantines
Immigrating has always had high risk crossing the seas, and for those who survived the travel faced  a full documentation and most often medical review. Newly arrived immigrants to North America – specifically Canada and the USA – were documented at processing stations and quarantine locations at their entry ports. So as the Irish arrived in every port in North America to escape wars, mistreatment, and famine, genealogists and family researchers must expand their research past New York.  Have you checked for your Irish ancestors in the Gross Île, Port of Québec records? Although the death rate was high, researchers may locate those who survived; and with a keen eye toward analysis, hints and names of other family members may be revealed.


Parks Canada Map
Gross Île Quarantine Station
Gross Île “was a quarantine station for the Port of Québec from 1832 – 1937. This quarantine station, located in the middle of the St. Lawrence River just south-east of Quebec, was originally established to contain the cholera epidemic in 1832.

Over 8000 immigrants, mostly Irish died of “Ship Fever” from 1847 - 1848, some referred to these ships as “coffin ships,” due to the typhus epidemic.  It has been estimated that over five thousand Irish were buried at sea. Many were interred in mass graves.

Visit Irish Central, The Ghosts of Grosse Ile. A monument was even erected in 1850 to honor those lost during the transport.
Montreal Star, 22 Dec 1900, p.19
Yet, in the 1847-1848 timeframe over 38 thousand Irish did arrive in Toronto. Toronto also had a high death rate, about 1100 Irish immigrants died of starvation and the harsh Canadian winters. For more information research Toronto’s Ireland Park, a memorial for the Famine Irish.

Know that quarantine stations were not uncommon.  One had been established as early as 1785 in Partridge Island, New Brunswick, near Saint John.  Another quarantine station was at Windmill Point, where over six thousand, mostly Irish, were buried.

Where to Begin?

Kathleen Brandt
a3Genealogy.com
Accurate, accessible answers
(reprint from Dec 2015)

Thursday, May 9, 2019

Exhausting Irish Resources


Prepping for the 2019 Irish Fest 
The 2019 Kansas City Irish Fest (KCIF) will be held 30 Aug - 1 Sep.  This year the Irish Fest will be hosting a four session genealogy workshop.  Tickets will go on sale 1 Jun.  So in preparation, I will be posting interesting tidbits on researching your Irish ancestors. For information on the workshop, contact kcirishfest.com.

Was Your Irish Ancestor in a Benevolent Society?
On 19 Sept 1872 the KC times reported on the first St. Patrick's Day parade in Kansas City.  "At 10:00 am, the procession formed at the hall of the Irish Benevolent Society. The order of  march was as follows: Grand Marshal and aids, Band of Music, Irish Benevolent Society, St. Vitus Benevolent Association (German), The St. Joseph Benevolent Association." [1]

Who, What, When, Where? My Irish Ancestors!
There are more than 250,000 in the Kansas City region who claim Irish heritage and as many ancestors who have participated in the Irish Day Parades beginning in 1872.

Any Irish ancestry researcher would be remiss if they chose to ignore the information this small blurb gives us. A few questions to consider: 1) Where were my ancestor's on that day? 2) Did they participate in the parade? 3) Did they belong to these organizations/societies? 4) Were they involved in the Irish community, church, politics or other labor unions? 5) What was their "pecking" order in the parade? 6) Were there other Irish organizations/societies?

Was He a Miner or a Musician?
"Members of the Ancient Order of Hibernians followed behind the priest and "marched like soldiers, justly proud of their appearance," observed the Times.  Behind the Hibernians were members of the St. Vincent de Paul Society, the Children of Mary and the St. Aloysius Band, marching with a huge portrait of their favored saint, the Patron of Youth, followed by the Irish benevolent societies.  The McGee Hook & Ladder Company rolled along behind department co-founder and Irish immigrant, Joe McArdle, with firemen pluming and strutting for the admiring crowds gathered on porches and sidewalks along the winding route." (Displayed at Kansas City Irish Fest; August 2011).

Just by knowing the origin of each group, you may be guided in the right direction. This is enough information to keep an Irish family researcher busy. Contemporary local books may give your research a jump start.  Newspaper articles, obituaries, journals, diaries, church records and court cases may also give the researcher a bit more information about the members of these organizations. 
Irish Parade Line Up, Kansas City Times
From the Missouri Irish: Kansas City, St. Louis & Trails West
Extract: pg. 141-142 O'Laughlin,  Michael C.
America’s oldest Irish Catholic Fraternal Organization founded concurrently in the coal-mining region of Pennsylvania and New York City in May, 1836.  Early Hibernians are linked to mining for gold (Yreka, CA), copper and silver (Butte & Anaconda, MT), iron ore in Escanaba, MI (St Patrick’s) and Mt Pleasant, PA (St Joseph’s), hard rock mining (St Peter’s, Rutland, VT) and coal in Schuylkill CO, PA. (where the infamous Molly Maguire trials were held.)
   
Molly Maguires
M
embers of an Irish-American secret society.  Members, mainly coal miners were associated with Pennsylvania anthracite coal fields in the Civil War era. The trials and arrests were from 1876−1878.

St. Aloysius Band

Formed from the St. John's society 75-100 'juveniles" of West Kansas City.
St. Vincent de Paul Society
Founded in 1833 by six university students in Paris under the patronage of St. Vincent de Paul. This primarily Irish society was introduced in Chicago during the economic depression of 1857. The Society's purpose was to provide direct aid to the suffering parishioners.
From the Bottom Up: The Story of the Irish in Kansas City, O'Neill, Pat

Reprinted from 16 Sep 2011
Kathleen Brandt
a3Genealogy@gmail.com