Friday, December 27, 2019

Researching in the Lost State of Franklin, 1785 - 1788

8FranklinCounties.png (1340×1029)
Smithsonian
Western North Carolina, Eastern Tennessee
We tease in the a3Genealogy researchers world, that dealing with records between 1785 - 1791, those four - five dreadful years of indecision, independence and defeat, in the "lost state of Franklin" will lead you down a never-ending rabbit hole.  It was not until recently that I realized that we have never posted about this research conundrum that has few answers, but with a bit of digging, you may ferret out your State of Franklin ensconced ancestors. (In Spanish the word is literally "escondido" - hidden).

But, regardless of how you describe it, many researches just caste out this western North Carolina & eastern Tennessee regional area's research challenges as the "Appalachian" puzzlement." (Say that fast five times - "Appalachian puzzlement)." What researchers fail to realize is that due to the independence of what now would be considered an eight county region in northeastern Tennessee historically 1) was part of North Carolina 2) operated independently for four years, 1785 - 1788 as its own "quasi-state" which was presented but denied statehood by the Continental Congress.

If all would have gone well, our 14th state "would have been" the State of Franklin.

Yes, this denied state, the state of Franklin, never made it to realization, but operated independently for about 4 years.  And, its citizens, our ancestors, left a papertrail.  An unorganized, uncompiled, incomplete, illogically placed papertrail, but somewhat of a papertrail nonetheless.  So let's go hunting for our ancestors in the state of Franklin - let's say between 1785 - 1791 (see the First Family Papers below).

Where to Begin
1)  History.  The not-quite -formed State of Franklin must be understood.   Be sure to understand the issues, formations, and fall of what would have been the state of Franklin. Even though it was never ratified, it surely left our proud ancestors' paperwork.
2) Land Grants. Partial Census of 1787 to 1791 of Tennessee as taken from the North Carolina Land Grants is a great source for reconstructing a census, and the inhabitants.
  • Family Search digitized film #1728882, item 4, or 
    Family search digitized film #1683130 item 3.
3) Proven First Families.
Add caption
Sometimes, we just want to see our ancestors in the right place at the right time.  Just a glimpse of their whereabouts. If you are wishing to get an alphabetically compiled list of surnames for First Families of Franklin Ancestors (updated 1993) visit the a3Genealogy First Families of Franklin Ancestors page.  This list was provided by Tipton - Haynes State Historic Site.

4) County Records & Archives. Of course records were created in North Carolina, especially land records. The counties of Sullivan, and Washington  Tennessee, (originally in North Carolina) have scattered records, some digitized. Marriages, deeds, wills and other court records can still be located within the counties of Washington County and Sullivan County, now Tennessee. Be sure to scour the records of the eight counties as well as both states.

Tennessee Historical Society, TN. State Library & Archives
Well, we are currently straddling the New Year. We wanted to start with something old, yet new for many.  Keep digging and if you uncover your own State of Franklin lost ancestor, be sure to let us know (with proven docs of course).

Happy New Year 2020
Kathleen Brandt
a3Genealogy@gmail.com 

Friday, November 22, 2019

Chancery Court Records

Sally Grimes, daughter of Gabriel Winston
Why Do We Forget Chancery Court Records?
Chancery Court records can be brickwall busters. Yet they are often overlooked.  Case in point, trying to sort common surnames and their family units. Let's take "Johnson" in 1700 Virginia.  Using the Chancery Court records we were able to distinguish Silas Johnson's family unit of VA. We were also  able to prove kinship of his Johnson descendants who settled in Howard County, Missouri. All the children were named in grandpa's record since their dad had died. 

Kinships Named: Parents and Maiden Names
As family researchers and genealogists, one of our common brick-walls is a result of the lack of resources to confirm kinships. Familiar relationships, parents’ names,  maiden names are all needed to complete family units, but what happens when we’ve exhausted all the normal resources - census, wills/probates, deeds, vital records, church records…etc.? Well, hopefully the researcher has not overlooked Chancery Records when they are available.

What are Chancery Court Records?
Chancery Court records hold a wealth of genealogical information. Although not necessarily a part of every states’ historical legal system, when available it will behoove the researcher to take more than a cursory glance at these genealogical-rich documents. Researchers will find personal testimonies that include family relationships. In some states (i.e. Virginia, Tennessee, etc) chancery court records are available from the early 18th century through early 1900’s. In Virginia alone there are over 233,000 multi-paged cases. More on Virginia Chancery Courts can be found at this informative piece. 

What is "Next Friend?"
Of course the key to understanding any court record relies on period vocabulary. In the Chancery Court record of Sally Grimes of Hanover County, VA vs. Joseph Grimes, Sally’s father Gabriel Winston is identified as both “father” and “next friend.”

A "next friend" can be considered the person who represents and speaks on behalf of the plaintiff. The next friend may be a parent, a guardian, an older sibling , etc.  By no means should the researcher assume it is a parent or even a relationship. We have uncovered many next friends proven not to be of blood relation.  In many cases the next friend is identified, removing the tempting guessing game and solidly identifying kinships. This is most useful, when also looking for a maiden name.  

Unlike many states, Delaware's "Court of Chancery" has survived since 1792.  Of course its roles, jurisdictions and litigation realms have been consistently updated to meet the needs of the court to include corporate litigation. Visit Delaware Courts for a quick history of the English Origins of the "Court of Chancery." 

As the times have changed, so has the role of the Chancery Court. In current day Mississippi Chancery Courts are the repository for land records.  Researchers will also find divorces, guardianships and wills in the Mississippi Chancery Courts.

Other states like Missouri, may boast of early records of the Chancery Court.  For St. Louis MO. Chancery Court Records may be found as early as 1811 to about the Civil War.  These records can be found at the Missouri State Archives. Like other states, Missouri researchers may find other counties with salvaged Chancery Court Records.  

Be sure to check FamilySearch Wiki for your state / county. 
(Updated from Chancery Court Records for Genealogy Brickwalls posted 3 May 2016).

Kathleen Brandt
a3Genealogy@gmail.com
accurate, accessible answers














Sunday, November 3, 2019

Researching War of 1812 Seamen

Impressed Seamen Records 1796-1868

After the revolutionary war, the British, under the motto “once a British subject, always a British subject”, took liberties on the sea and captured US flagged vessels.  The result: “Impressed” American mariners into British service, and of course, the War of 1812. For this reason, many will tell you the Revolutionary War did not end until the War of 1812. Yet, impressed seaman protection certificates were available to seaman until after the civil war. And actually they have been used at different times in U.S. history.

In order to track American sailors and their ships, a plethora of detailed paperwork and records were generated on merchant seamen.  These salvaged papers can be a treasure chest for the family historian. 

Quick Primer
A quick primer on the Seamen’s Protection Center can be found on the the Ancestry.com Learning Center. 

Search for Seamen's Protection Certificate Learning Center
As you can see in the photo above the seaman came from all states. The collection holds certificates for seamen between 11-77 years of age.  Above, John Finn, was 14 year old and was from Hermann, Mo.  He worked out of the Port of Philadelphia. So, don’t limit your research.

It is possible your seaman was captured and his original (or second or third) certificate was confiscated. So it is not uncommon to find several applications for one seaman. 

Begin Your Search
Ancestry.com has a digitized collection of U.S. Seamen’s Protection Certificates.  

African American Seamen
Historical Trivia
Question: What African American slave ran away with the assistance of a U.S. Seamen’s Protection Certificate.
Answer: Frederick Douglass who borrowed a Seamen’s Certificate to aid in his runaway. He was also donning a sailor suit. 
African Americans seamen were in abundance.  The records identify them as “black”, “negro”, “colored”, “sambo”, “ethiopian” and “mulatto”.  


Four Bonus Finds
 
1) Physical Descriptions. As you can see, physical description to include scars and marks are noted.  Statement of “native” hometown and stated is also noted.

2) Emancipation Information. In the above example of Samuel Ridley, an ex-slave, informs the intaker that he “was manumitted in the year 1792 by Stephen... Samuel’s application goes on to tell us that he had to serve nine years for a man (name given) in Philadelphia for his freedom. 

3) Naturalization Information. Of course to have protection of the United States, you had to prove citizenship as Bernard Tobin did below on his application. 
 
Do hereby declare that I am a Seaman and an affiliated Citizen of the United States, having been born in the Town of St. Johns Newfoundland and have declared my Intention of becoming a citizen of the United States in the Circuit Court holden in Philadelphia on the 27th of December 1856 a certificate whereof I herewith present . . .
4) Family Information. As in the example above all the certificates are sworn by a witness. This witness is often a family member.  Sometimes, we find wife’s or mother’s names on these applications.  

1930 Census, Merchant Seaman
Know that the War of 1812 is not the only time merchants were enumerated. In 1930 census Merchant Seamen were enumerated if serving on a US flagged vessel. There was a special Merchant Seamen schedule.  This schedule provided genealogical data and can be searched on the 1930 Census of Merchant Seamen on ancestry.com or with in the NARA (microfilm). View the  Family Search.org website for more information.

For More Information
Be sure to read the following articles:
National Archive Resources
  • M2025: Registers of Applications for the Release of Impressed Seamen (microfilm)
  • M1839: Miscellaneous Lists and Papers Regarding Impressed Seamen, 1796-1814  (microfilm) 
Kathleen Brandt
Website: a3genealogy.com
a3genealogy@gmail.com
Accurate, accessible answers



(Original post 1 Jun 2013)

Thursday, September 19, 2019

2020 Speaker Series


One Motivated Mama Inspirational "Where you are going" Canvas by Ana Brandt.    www.shoptaopan.com  #inspiration #motivation #knowwhereyouaregoing #whereyoucamefrom #canvas #wallart #motivatedmama:
Visit Ana Brandt's Site
These are just a few titles offered by Kathleen Brandt as a conference Keynote Speaker or seminar Presenter. All are tailored to your conference theme or celebration. If you don't see what you want here, know I offer custom designed presentations and workshops. Know that all of the presentations are chocked full of actual images and many have real life short case studies. 

I am now scheduling for 2017.  But remember, I am often called upon as a last minute substitute, because we can never plan for those unplanned "life" events

Be sure to review the Experience/Qualifications page. 

Kathleen Brandt
Keynote Speaker/Presenter
816-729-5995

Presentation Titles for Your Conference or Workshops

Military
Revolutionary War
·         Finding Your Revolutionary War Soldier
·         7 Best Revolutionary War Resources
·         Your Blacksheep: Courts-martial and Courts of inquiry records
War of 1812
·         War of 1812 Records: 10 Places to Research
·         Researching Your War of 1812 Impressed Seamen
Revolutionary War and War of 1812
·         African Americans Served Too – Finding Records
Civil War
·         10 Best Bets for Civil War Research 
·         7 Tips to Researching Slaves and Slaveholders
·         Finding Your Elusive Civil War Veteran
·         Claim It!  Southern Claims Commission Records and Slave Claims Commission Records
·         Researching Grand Army of the Republic (GAR) and other Association Records
·         Civil War POW Records
Modern Wars (WWI - WWII
·         Military Records Were Destroyed? What to Do?
·         7 Easy Tips to WWI and WWII Research
·         Forgotten Records -  WWI and WWII

Research Methodology
·         Leaping Over Brickwalls
·         The Changing Surname - How to Trace It?

DNA
·         DNA: Spit or Swab?  (Beginner)
·         DNA for Genealogists: Who? What?, When? Where? (Intermediate)
·         From History to Present: DNA Research (Case Studies)
·         DNA All Day Workshop (all levels)
·         Using DNA for your Brickwalls (Intermediate)
·         DNA for Private Investigators (How It's Done)
·         Connecting Biological Families (As Seen On TV)

Research Tools
·         Tech Toys for Genealogists: It’s All Portable
·         Oral and Family History: Sharing Our Ancestors
·         The Cloud: Looking Forward to Backing Up
·         Technology Toolbox for Genealogists

African American Research
·         7 Tips to Researching Slaves and Slaveholders (with MO. Case Study)
·         Researching the Road to Freedom (Prior to the Civil War)
·         7 Resources to Researching Missouri Ex-Slaves and Free-Coloreds.
·         Using Ship Manifests for Slave Research
·         African Americans Served Too: Finding Revolutionary War and War of 1812 Records
·         A History of Military Service by African Americans (Learn about these Veterans and the Records) 


International: Emigration - Immigration
·         When They Came to America Where Did They Go?
·         Blackbirding: Sugar, Cotton, and Slaves! Researching South Pacific Island Laborers
·         Did Your Ancestor Become a US Citizen? Where to find Records and Documents

Local Topics and Custom Designed Presentations
Have a unique topic?  Due to our vast client base and experience, presentation just for your local group can be customized. Of course actual images of documents and relevant research tips are shared and often accompanied by a case study.
·         “Delegation of Colored Men” 7 Resources to Researching Western-North Carolina Ex-Slaves and Free-Coloreds.
·         Pioneer Trail From Missouri to California: How to Trace Them?
·         Tracing My State Militia Records
·         Tracing Huguenots – From There to Here

Motivational
·         Your Pioneer Ancestor and You!  How Our Ancestors Did It?
·         The Invisible Staircase: How Missouri Did It!

Entrepreneur You
·         Make Money: Your Genealogy Empire


Midwest and Missouri Specific
Image result for midwest map
Midwest German Settlers
·         Researching Germans from Russia Ancestors
·         8 Tips to Researching Your Missouri Rhineland Ancestors

Missouri Irish
·         Tips to Tracing Your MO. Irish Ancestor - From Immigration to Emigration

Bohemian Settlements
·         5 Research Tips to MO. Bohemian Ancestors

Wednesday, August 28, 2019

Kansas City Irish Fest

Will I be seeing you at the Kansas City Irish Fest?

Kathleen Brandt of a3Genealogy will be presenting four fun filled Irish research topics this Saturday, 31 Sat. She will share how the professionals solve cases, and best tips and hints to Irish brickwalls. a3Genealogy is an international genealogical and historical research firm. 

Surname changes? No problem! Did you know DNA - can help with that brickwall? Where did your Irish ancestor settle? Tracing your MIssouri Irish? (Wink wink, this does span further than Kansas City). 

Just getting started, or hitting a brick wall, this is a great place to start. Be sure to get your ticket! 

Click Kansas City Irish Fest for more information.

Let's hope the Irish good luck will bring us perfect weather.

Wednesday, June 26, 2019

Missouri Ex-Slave Resource


Colored Marriages of Saline County, MO, 1865-1870
Three hundred and forty-one African-American couples registered their marriages with the Saline County, MO. courthouse between 1865 and 1870. The Colored Marriages of Saline County, 1865 - 1870 is indexed by both groom and bride, and holds a complete copy of the original 111 page Court Recorder Colored Marriage Record book. The marriage records include the names of enslaved children born of each union. It also provides the researcher with names of black settlements, names of active church leaders that performed the marriages, and twenty historical black cemeteries of Saline County, MO.

Published in 2014, this reference book may be available through your local library or Interlibrary Loan (ILL).


Kathleen Brandt, the founder of a3Genealogy, Kansas City, Mo,- was researching in Saline County, MO when she eyed a registry: Colored Marriages of Saline County, 1865-1870. One of the first rights granted to freed-slaves was to legalize their slave marriages. Information from these records will link the African American researcher to slave ancestors. It will also encourage descendants of Slave Masters to reference one more resource in their research.  

 Get your copy now!  

Colored Marriages 1865-1870
 

Colored Marriages 1865-1870
 
Kathleen Brandt
a3genealogy.com
a3genealogy@gmail.com

Thursday, June 20, 2019

Irish Research, Canadian Immigration 1847-1848

Joliet (IL) Signal, 17 Aug 1847
We often need to be reminded to streatch our research.  Irish research is an a3Genealogy favorite.  Here are some tips to locating that elusive ancestor. 

Grosse Île - Immigration and Quarantines
Immigrating has always had high risk crossing the seas, and for those who survived the travel faced  a full documentation and most often medical review. Newly arrived immigrants to North America – specifically Canada and the USA – were documented at processing stations and quarantine locations at their entry ports. So as the Irish arrived in every port in North America to escape wars, mistreatment, and famine, genealogists and family researchers must expand their research past New York.  Have you checked for your Irish ancestors in the Gross Île, Port of Québec records? Although the death rate was high, researchers may locate those who survived; and with a keen eye toward analysis, hints and names of other family members may be revealed.


Parks Canada Map
Gross Île Quarantine Station
Gross Île “was a quarantine station for the Port of Québec from 1832 – 1937. This quarantine station, located in the middle of the St. Lawrence River just south-east of Quebec, was originally established to contain the cholera epidemic in 1832.

Over 8000 immigrants, mostly Irish died of “Ship Fever” from 1847 - 1848, some referred to these ships as “coffin ships,” due to the typhus epidemic.  It has been estimated that over five thousand Irish were buried at sea. Many were interred in mass graves.

Visit Irish Central, The Ghosts of Grosse Ile. A monument was even erected in 1850 to honor those lost during the transport.
Montreal Star, 22 Dec 1900, p.19
Yet, in the 1847-1848 timeframe over 38 thousand Irish did arrive in Toronto. Toronto also had a high death rate, about 1100 Irish immigrants died of starvation and the harsh Canadian winters. For more information research Toronto’s Ireland Park, a memorial for the Famine Irish.

Know that quarantine stations were not uncommon.  One had been established as early as 1785 in Partridge Island, New Brunswick, near Saint John.  Another quarantine station was at Windmill Point, where over six thousand, mostly Irish, were buried.

Where to Begin?

Kathleen Brandt
a3Genealogy.com
Accurate, accessible answers
(reprint from Dec 2015)

Thursday, May 9, 2019

Exhausting Irish Resources


Prepping for the 2019 Irish Fest 
The 2019 Kansas City Irish Fest (KCIF) will be held 30 Aug - 1 Sep.  This year the Irish Fest will be hosting a four session genealogy workshop.  Tickets will go on sale 1 Jun.  So in preparation, I will be posting interesting tidbits on researching your Irish ancestors. For information on the workshop, contact kcirishfest.com.

Was Your Irish Ancestor in a Benevolent Society?
On 19 Sept 1872 the KC times reported on the first St. Patrick's Day parade in Kansas City.  "At 10:00 am, the procession formed at the hall of the Irish Benevolent Society. The order of  march was as follows: Grand Marshal and aids, Band of Music, Irish Benevolent Society, St. Vitus Benevolent Association (German), The St. Joseph Benevolent Association." [1]

Who, What, When, Where? My Irish Ancestors!
There are more than 250,000 in the Kansas City region who claim Irish heritage and as many ancestors who have participated in the Irish Day Parades beginning in 1872.

Any Irish ancestry researcher would be remiss if they chose to ignore the information this small blurb gives us. A few questions to consider: 1) Where were my ancestor's on that day? 2) Did they participate in the parade? 3) Did they belong to these organizations/societies? 4) Were they involved in the Irish community, church, politics or other labor unions? 5) What was their "pecking" order in the parade? 6) Were there other Irish organizations/societies?

Was He a Miner or a Musician?
"Members of the Ancient Order of Hibernians followed behind the priest and "marched like soldiers, justly proud of their appearance," observed the Times.  Behind the Hibernians were members of the St. Vincent de Paul Society, the Children of Mary and the St. Aloysius Band, marching with a huge portrait of their favored saint, the Patron of Youth, followed by the Irish benevolent societies.  The McGee Hook & Ladder Company rolled along behind department co-founder and Irish immigrant, Joe McArdle, with firemen pluming and strutting for the admiring crowds gathered on porches and sidewalks along the winding route." (Displayed at Kansas City Irish Fest; August 2011).

Just by knowing the origin of each group, you may be guided in the right direction. This is enough information to keep an Irish family researcher busy. Contemporary local books may give your research a jump start.  Newspaper articles, obituaries, journals, diaries, church records and court cases may also give the researcher a bit more information about the members of these organizations. 
Irish Parade Line Up, Kansas City Times
From the Missouri Irish: Kansas City, St. Louis & Trails West
Extract: pg. 141-142 O'Laughlin,  Michael C.
America’s oldest Irish Catholic Fraternal Organization founded concurrently in the coal-mining region of Pennsylvania and New York City in May, 1836.  Early Hibernians are linked to mining for gold (Yreka, CA), copper and silver (Butte & Anaconda, MT), iron ore in Escanaba, MI (St Patrick’s) and Mt Pleasant, PA (St Joseph’s), hard rock mining (St Peter’s, Rutland, VT) and coal in Schuylkill CO, PA. (where the infamous Molly Maguire trials were held.)
   
Molly Maguires
M
embers of an Irish-American secret society.  Members, mainly coal miners were associated with Pennsylvania anthracite coal fields in the Civil War era. The trials and arrests were from 1876−1878.

St. Aloysius Band

Formed from the St. John's society 75-100 'juveniles" of West Kansas City.
St. Vincent de Paul Society
Founded in 1833 by six university students in Paris under the patronage of St. Vincent de Paul. This primarily Irish society was introduced in Chicago during the economic depression of 1857. The Society's purpose was to provide direct aid to the suffering parishioners.
From the Bottom Up: The Story of the Irish in Kansas City, O'Neill, Pat

Reprinted from 16 Sep 2011
Kathleen Brandt
a3Genealogy@gmail.com

Friday, May 3, 2019

French and Spanish Settlers in Pre-Statehood Missouri

Early American Survey using Arpents (Fr)
Missouri - The Midwest Gateway
Before Missouri became a state (1821), before the Anglo-Americans moved West, and before the railroads, steamboats and wagon trains traversed Missouri, there were the French and Spanish Settlers.
Missouri was initially part of the Louisiana Territory.  Known as “Upper Louisiana,” the territory was settled first by the French Canadians as they moved west from Illinois about 1750, establishing St. Genevieve.  Then St. Louis was founded by the French migrating up the Mississippi River from New Orleans in 1767. Although the French had first settled this area, Spain had control from 1762 to 1800, when Spain ceded control to France in a treaty.
With the Louisiana Purchase (1803) from France, America agreed to honor all previous land purchases and claims from the French and Spanish by the settlers.  While noble in theory, it was rather difficult to execute in practice for several reasons.
  • Very few (about 1%) of the original patents (title/deed) of the early settlers were perfected (the paperwork complete)
  • The lots were typically organized in long strips emanating from the town or river and not the standard grid (rectangular survey system) now in place for all Public Lands.
  • The land was measured in French “arpents” not acres as we’re accustomed.  A square arpent is about .84 acre.
  • Often lands not occupied or abandoned by the settler often reverted back to government (French or Spanish) ownership.
Nonetheless, Congress decided to let the settlers complete the patent process, register them with the United States, and retain ownership of their claims. A Board of Commissioners was established in 1808 to sit and hear claims of the settlers as to the proper ownership of their land.  The Board remained in operation through 1812 and gave certificates confirming 1,342 land claims.  New statutes, new boards, and more certificates were granted in 1816 and 1834 certifying 1,754 and 90 more claims respectively.

The Records
[Yes, when Louisiana became a State in 1812, the documents and records were housed in the Missouri Territory until abt. 1821.]

The good news for genealogists is that the records of the Board of Commissioners have been published in several books, segmented by Congressional Session, which fall along a chronological timeline.  Generally these read like court hearings with the land described then witness testimony supplied.
Here we go!
    • 1813: Land claims in the Missouri Territory : records of the 12th Congress, second session, Mountain Press
    • 1834: Private land claims in Missouri, 1834 : United States: House of Representatives document 1178, Twenty-third Congress – First session (full text on Hathi Trust)  by Elijah Hayward, Mountain Press
    • 1835:  Missouri Land Claims published by Polyanthos (1976). The portion selected are the 90 claims approved in the 1834 Commission meeting and the 152 claims rejected by the 1834 Commission . Every name index. [The last claim rejected, #152, says the claimant requested 500,000 arpents.  That’s a lot of land!!  I can see why he was rejected.]
    • 1835: Land claims in Missouri : House of Representatives 24th Congress, First session – document numbered 1538
    • 1835: Final adjustments of private land claims in Missouri, 1832 : House of Representatives document 1340, 24th Congress – First session, 1835 by Ethan Allen Brown, Mountain Press
As an alternative to the original documents, you can try checking out a three volume series by Frances Terry Ingmire, Citizens of Missouri Territory, Mountain Press, 1984.  He has abstracted the Congressional Record and included an every name index.
Finally, if you’re still feeling a little overwhelmed now and are wondering how to navigate a fist full of Congressional hearing records, don’t worry. There’s help. Several finding aids have been published to aid in your research.
Finding Aids
  • Index to Minutes of the First and Second Board of Land Commission Meetings 1805-1812, 1832-1835. by the St. Louis Genealogical Society
  • Early settlers of Missouri as taken from land claims in the Missouri Territory by Walter Lowrie, Southern Historical Press, 1986
  • Index of purchasers : United States land sales in Missouri by Ozarks Genealogical Society, 1985
  • Index to French and Spanish land grants recorded in registers of land titles in Missouri: Books A, B, C, D, E by Betty Harvey Williams, self-published, 1977
If your ancestor staked a claim in Pre-Statehood Missouri, you have an impressive story to tell. It’s well worth your time to find the documents to shape the story to share with the next generation.

Article reprint from "Genealogy Decoded" with permission by:
Beth Foulk
About the Author
Research Relationship with a3Genealogy since 2008 Beth Foulk has turned a lifetime genealogy passion into an opportunity to share what she’s learned with genealogists across the country. She has documented her Civil War, War of 1812, and Revolutionary War ancestors.  She has mapped the migration of her Kansas and Missouri pioneers.  And researched the arrival of her many Massachusetts Colonial settlers. 
Each ancestor and each story quickly become a “teaching moment” for her classes. “The only thing more fun than a genealogy find, is sharing what I’ve learned to help other genealogists.”

Foulk has been “spreading the genealogy gospel” since 2008 when she first taught as a volunteer at the Midwest Genealogy Center in Independence, Missouri.