Sunday, September 4, 2011

Civil War Speaker Series


Kathleen Brandt
Audience: All levels of researchers may benefit (Beg, Interm, Adv)
For More Information: a3genealogy@gmail.com; 816-729-5995Location

Civil War Series
CW101: 10 Best Bets to Civil War Research
CW102: Finding the Elusive Civil War Ancestor
CW103: African Americans Served Too
CW104: Civil War POW Records
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CW101: 10 Best Bets to Civil War Research 
Abstract:
If your family lived in the United States in the 1860s, chances are you're related to someone who served in the Civil War. Perhaps your great- or great-great-grandfather was among the 2.1 million men mustered in the Union Army or the 800,000 to 900,000 men who were on the Confederate side. Or maybe a great-aunt served as a scout, nurse or spy. She may even have been among the several hundred females who, disguised as men, actually fought on the ground.

The Civil War touched the life of every citizen. The Union enlisted nearly 180,000 black soldiers. African Americans also served with Confederate forces as laborers and servants — and a handful even served as soldiers at the end of the war. Native Americans were involved in the western theater for the Union and defended Southern lands with the Confederacy.  Many records to uncover your Civil War veteran are overlooked.

Description:
This PowerPoint presentation provides the researcher with tips, hints and hidden resources to uncover Union and Confederate Soldiers, and women who served or supported troops. It also discusses why your ancestor may not have served.  Handouts will be available.
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CW102: Finding the Elusive Civil War Ancestor
Abstract:
Many family researchers have given up on finding information on their civil war era ancestor.  Perhaps, they can’t find any record verifying that they ever served in the Civil.  Or maybe they can’t understand why their perfectly aged ancestor didn’t serve in the war.  Or were your ancestors in one of the five Confederate dominate states – the CarolinasVirginiaMississippi, and Alabama – where many records were lost? You may wish to extend your search to the Provost Marshal Records and Adjutant General Office records.

Description:
This PowerPoint presentation guides the researcher through revealing NARA Civil War records.  Various Provost Marshal and other records held at the NARA will be discussed, as well as State held records. Handouts will be available.
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CW103: African Americans Served Too
Abstract:
African Americans served in both the Union and Confederate armies. Some served by choice, some as substitutes for a slave master, or as part of an emancipation agreement. Of course there were also the Free-coloreds and runaway slaves.

Over 180,000 African Americans comprising 163 units served in the Union Army during the Civil War, and many more African Americans served in the Union Navy.  African Americans were being recruited for the United States Colored Troops as early as 1863;  many were granted veteran pensions.  By the end of the war, the Confederate armies also made allowance for African American recruits. Final burial places, POW camps, State and Federal records may lead the researcher to their African American Civil War veteran.

Description:
This PowerPoint guided workshop presents the researcher with a compilation of resources, links and repositories to uncover their African American Civil War veterans. Historical and political impact of the African American soldier is also discussed. Handouts will be available.
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 CW104: Civil War POW Records
Abstract:
It's impossible to research the Civil War era, without reviewing POW records. There were more than 160 prisons holding 647,000 prisoners captured during the Civil War. Many were paroled in the field, but 215,000 Confederate soldiers (and citizens) were held in Union prisons; 26,000 died while being held.  Of the 195,000 Union soldiers (and citizens) held in Confederate prisons, 30,000 died while imprisoned.  Although some records were destroyed and burials places removed, many records have survived and may be used to locate your Civil War veteran. These records confirm burials, prisoner's exchanges, escapes and more.

Description:
This PowerPoint presentation gives the researcher an overview of the most notorious Union and Confederate POW camps, and lesser known camps in various states. Helpful resources to POW Civil War research will be provided. Handouts will be available.
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Bio:
Kathleen Brandt is a Professional International Genealogist and Consultant and is a published freelance writer for genealogy magazines and columns. She is also the author of the a3Genealogy educational and skill building blog that explores various cultural and ethnic folk life, traditions, history, and genealogy research tips. Utilizing twenty years as an international corporate executive and five years of teaching college level Spanish, French and English writing courses, Kathleen offers workshops and lectures to the genealogy community and is a consultant for various corporate historical, cultural, and genealogy projects. As a multilingual speaker, she translates Spanish, French, and Italian records and has experience researching German, Swedish and Hellenic records. Celebrated clients: NBC, Who Do You Think You Are? Season 2 and Season 3 (2011-2012); featured on Tim McGraw episode; and PBS- Finding Your Roots. Visit website: www.a3genealogy.com.

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